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Hijabis Doing Things!

So here’s the deal. The past decade hasn’t exactly shed the best light on Islam. Muslim women are portrayed as oppressed, helpless, voiceless, and faceless in the mainstream media. The truth is, we’re everything but. And here is the proof. Here is our collection of pictures of women that wear hijab (the traditional Islamic dress covering the head) doing all kinds of things.

[This blog is run by three hijabi sisters, living in London, Ontario]

Email hijabisdoingthings@gmail.com with your submissions


Ask me anything  
Hijabi competing in a track meet.

Hijabi competing in a track meet.

Hijabis riding dirt bikes.

Hijabis riding dirt bikes.

Hijabis on a helicopter.

Hijabis on a helicopter.

A Hijabi canoeing at Muskoka.

A Hijabi canoeing at Muskoka.

Hoodie or Hijab; Racism is Racism

Salaams! Hello to all our followers! 

Please look up and join the following Facebook group in order to raise awareness for Shaima Al Awadi and Trayvon Martin. Take photos of yourselves with the signs and help bring racism to an end!

http://www.facebook.com/groups/168774903243728/

A Hijabi ready to go Go-Karting.

A Hijabi ready to go Go-Karting.

Coudn’t have said it better ourselves <3

We received an email from a dear reader who, although she is not Muslim, wanted to try wearing the Hijab for the sake of research. We encouraged this experiment, asking only that she share her reflections at the end of her day. This is the message she shared with us, and insha’Allah, it will have the same, moving effect on you as it did on us. May Allah guide her and grant her peace.

***

I put on my headscarf this morning and I felt a build-up of anxiety. I live near a military base, and the Islamophobia is palpable. On the way to class, I allowed myself to relax, and right when I was more excited about the promise of the day, I saw this bumper sticker:
"My One True God Can Beat Up Your Arab Myth"
http://www.onesourcetactical.com/images/products/detail/IMG_0681.jpg
The anxiety returned, but I felt personally indignant, despite not being Muslim. Passive islamophobia is one thing, but xenophobic, zealous ignorance is an entirely different thing. It was at the very beginning of my casual research into Islam that I ran into the phrase “People of the Book.” I notice time and time again a sense of respect for these “People of the Book”, Jews and Christians. Someone actively put that on their vehicle. Someone either ignores or denies that Muslims and Christians worship the same God. Any doubts I had about my desire to experience a day in the life of a hijabi disappeared. This was confirmation for me that I am making something worthwhile, and I will never be willfully ignorant. 
I was very pleasantly surprised. The hijab itself was comforting to me. I had on loose-fitting comfortable clothing from head to toe. I didn’t worry about my hair style coming apart. I didn’t have to constantly adjust my belt-line. I have a tendency of sucking in my stomach when I walk across the room, but today I breathed freely all day long. In fact, any discomfort I experienced from being stared at occasionally, was entirely outweighed by the personal comfort of being covered so completely and naturally.  I find it interesting that trying to dress as a modern Western woman, in the way we’re encouraged by the media to dress, is so entirely UNNATURAL and horribly UNCOMFORTABLE. Not to mention that the styles are often only flattering to an ideal body type that many of us do not, and will not, have. 
I have had conversations with some hijabis and non-hijabis about self-perception. I know some people feel more beautiful with their hair uncovered and make-up and adornments. Some women outright say they cannot feel beautiful wearing hijab. I felt it to be entirely the opposite. I felt today that I looked better, not sexier or more alluring, but better. I felt very much like myself. 
Some people stared, primarily children and older people. Other people made eye contact and actually were very friendly. Some people who know me talked to me, and asked me about hijab, and I had many interesting conversations. It was a very pleasant experience. What I was overwhelmed by was how much of wearing hijab is an internal experience. Maybe it’s something that can only be experienced by a woman who has lived for years outside of hijab. Western women who see hijab as a symbol of oppression should think about the feeling of trying to keep low cut jeans up. I find those darn jeans far more oppressive. In fact, I’m going to continue to wear hijab for now. I am sure there is still more to explore.
Iranian archer Shiva Mafakheri aims at a target during horseback archery competitions, in Tehran, on May 28, 2011.

Iranian archer Shiva Mafakheri aims at a target during horseback archery competitions, in Tehran, on May 28, 2011.

We recieved this poem, and we had to share :)

"Tawheed is an embrace of an aura that breathes the breath of creation from Allah.
The Hijab is the breeze of ocean waves whose white caps capture the flow beneath.
The comb and brush of each wave gives the follicle it’s own tide.
The shoreline covers all the waves that come and go inhale and exhale.
The forehead receives Hijab with open arms and gives humanity her attributes.
Let Hijab welcome Niqab whose pearls are the lips of ocean deep.
Allah gives mercy a depth a weave a needle point a fabric of creation even our soul!
White caps of ocean waves the crest of Godly praise,
Oh speck of sand garment her beauty the wings that cover metamorphose her Islam!”
 
Written by Anthony Mazereeuw
A Hijabi going to a business meeting.

A Hijabi going to a business meeting.